ΛSTROMΛNTΛ

fuck-zines:

DECAPITRON 38 / KIKIFRUIT / 60 ISUES / DITTO PRINTED BY SHOBOSHOBO BOOKS

10,00 € TTC PLUS SHIPPING

ALL THE BOOKS ARE DIFFERENT

SOME PICTURE A BIT CONFUSE SOMETIME BUT CHARMING BOOK ABOUT THE FAMOUS FRENCH GAME ” FORT BOYARD “

AN A4 POSTER WITH THE BOOK

Technique: ditto print

Print size: A6 : 10,5 x 10,48 cm

40 PAGES

Fort Boyard Fanfiction.


5♫
Also got this because I Am An Idiot

Also got this because I Am An Idiot

tezukainenglish:

Next up, take a look at the logos for Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] (1968-69), Buddha [ブッダ] (1972-83), and Ayako [奇子] (1972-73).
Again, three very different stories reflected in their logos. Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] portrays the feeling of frantic energy being barely contained, while the austerity and seriousness of Tezuka’s Buddha [ブッダ] almost feels chiseled out of the stone. Finally, the tight, thin but untidy lines of Ayako [奇子] exemplifies the corrupt underbelly of a family trying to save face.

Meanwhile I read Tezuka’s Ayako. Kinda lazy to pick it apart so I will reblog this instead. I’m both tired of Tezuka and tired of people laying it on Tezuka. What a fucking workhorse genius, but also a sadistic man that uses his talent to make the audience endure terrible concepts (Ayako: girl growing up in the cellar). So you get the familial core unravelling as we get to the 70s, but through it we also get a meta-key of some mysterious happenings of the decade. 700 pages of tying loose ends via familial decadence.

tezukainenglish:

Next up, take a look at the logos for Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] (1968-69), Buddha [ブッダ] (1972-83), and Ayako [奇子] (1972-73).

Again, three very different stories reflected in their logos. Swallowing the Earth [地球を呑む] portrays the feeling of frantic energy being barely contained, while the austerity and seriousness of Tezuka’s Buddha [ブッダ] almost feels chiseled out of the stone. Finally, the tight, thin but untidy lines of Ayako [奇子] exemplifies the corrupt underbelly of a family trying to save face.

Meanwhile I read Tezuka’s Ayako. Kinda lazy to pick it apart so I will reblog this instead. I’m both tired of Tezuka and tired of people laying it on Tezuka. What a fucking workhorse genius, but also a sadistic man that uses his talent to make the audience endure terrible concepts (Ayako: girl growing up in the cellar). So you get the familial core unravelling as we get to the 70s, but through it we also get a meta-key of some mysterious happenings of the decade. 700 pages of tying loose ends via familial decadence.

Koshoku Robot

Koshoku Robot


5♫

Spent a good lot of time on japanese-language shops eyeing their ridiculously cheap goodies. Of course I could only feast my eyes on new, better-looking things in japanese (like Hisae Iwaoka’s Koshoku Robot), so all I got was these yaoi books, a poster book, and what looks to be a production book from the second Gundam movie.


2♫
Got back from Paris today with lots of notes, and suddenly I have a tight schedule; this weekend I’ll be swamped, then Monday I leave again. This is highly unusual for my sluggish schedule.
So first of all I turned 30 in Paris. Why Paris? Why turn 30? At 30 the pressure of time is unavoidable; there’s that round number smiling, asking you what you’ve done so far (and there are so many booming talents nowadays). Then again I “failed” very early on, and so I missed a lot of goals people ache to achieve. My current situation has that air of indulgence and luck that could make a session with a mirror go awkward. That made me climb up the walls for a few months. Now that I’m back, I feel like I found something to the side, ideas on how to transform my life in ways that are “generational”, might take 10 years or more, and will take time. This is something I never bothered with, and I will wear my twenties proudly for that.
I went to Paris for the fourth time. My previous visits were romantic somehow, but things went sour anyway. Let’s see what happens now. Paris is unmovable; the core capital of the 19th Century is still there. Culturally it has become american, appropriating things from other cultures with genuine curiosity; you can ignore most “french” icons in favour of everything else, but in return they will boast that French (white, upper-class) urban way of life. I didn’t find that shine in labor-intensive London, nor Berlin, which still seems too into itself, even if they have their little ghettos and art shows.

Got back from Paris today with lots of notes, and suddenly I have a tight schedule; this weekend I’ll be swamped, then Monday I leave again. This is highly unusual for my sluggish schedule.

So first of all I turned 30 in Paris. Why Paris? Why turn 30? At 30 the pressure of time is unavoidable; there’s that round number smiling, asking you what you’ve done so far (and there are so many booming talents nowadays). Then again I “failed” very early on, and so I missed a lot of goals people ache to achieve. My current situation has that air of indulgence and luck that could make a session with a mirror go awkward. That made me climb up the walls for a few months. Now that I’m back, I feel like I found something to the side, ideas on how to transform my life in ways that are “generational”, might take 10 years or more, and will take time. This is something I never bothered with, and I will wear my twenties proudly for that.

I went to Paris for the fourth time. My previous visits were romantic somehow, but things went sour anyway. Let’s see what happens now. Paris is unmovable; the core capital of the 19th Century is still there. Culturally it has become american, appropriating things from other cultures with genuine curiosity; you can ignore most “french” icons in favour of everything else, but in return they will boast that French (white, upper-class) urban way of life. I didn’t find that shine in labor-intensive London, nor Berlin, which still seems too into itself, even if they have their little ghettos and art shows.


3♫

2♫

6♫

4♫
girlmountain:

2010. for some anthology about ghosts that never came out.

Thank you.

girlmountain:

2010. for some anthology about ghosts that never came out.

Thank you.


3♫
This “Sub’s Way” appeared to me sometime after a wide search for “bara”, “hentai”, and “smut” titles on mangaupdates. 

This “Sub’s Way” appeared to me sometime after a wide search for “bara”, “hentai”, and “smut” titles on mangaupdates. 


1♫
This looks nice, though. There’s a certain classicism to it, much like the repackaging of an Ozu film. I was reading a review of this thing, and the writer says that Ryan Holmberg is working on a book on Garo. Does anyone know if this is true? I would hit that.

This looks nice, though. There’s a certain classicism to it, much like the repackaging of an Ozu film. I was reading a review of this thing, and the writer says that Ryan Holmberg is working on a book on Garo. Does anyone know if this is true? I would hit that.


3♫
I was reading, I think it was Jason Thompson on AnimeNewsNetwork or the Hooded Utilitarian, and remember him commenting that most “fine” publishers have turned to Tezuka and Gekiga because their adult-ness is evident to the average reader and also because their stuff doesn’t necessarily demand a multi-volume commitment. So, serial storytelling outside of this axis is usually overlooked (Thompson glorifies Umezu and Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, which I’ve ordered because I am a sheep). Anyway, american indie publishers that don’t traditionally publish manga have turned to the “classics”, and the pieces are spread throughout a number of players. This is the explanation for an IDW edition of Kazuo Umezu, their first manga. What can you make of this hideous thing? I used to like Ashley Wood, back when he drew Automatic Kafka. He had this coolness about him, his Popbot book of sexy chics and robots was out, he was associated with designer trends.. I kinda lost track of him. But why in the world of fuck would you slap a mediocre Ashley Wood cover on a Kazuo Umezu book? IDW, you’re out.

I was reading, I think it was Jason Thompson on AnimeNewsNetwork or the Hooded Utilitarian, and remember him commenting that most “fine” publishers have turned to Tezuka and Gekiga because their adult-ness is evident to the average reader and also because their stuff doesn’t necessarily demand a multi-volume commitment. So, serial storytelling outside of this axis is usually overlooked (Thompson glorifies Umezu and Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, which I’ve ordered because I am a sheep). Anyway, american indie publishers that don’t traditionally publish manga have turned to the “classics”, and the pieces are spread throughout a number of players. This is the explanation for an IDW edition of Kazuo Umezu, their first manga. What can you make of this hideous thing? I used to like Ashley Wood, back when he drew Automatic Kafka. He had this coolness about him, his Popbot book of sexy chics and robots was out, he was associated with designer trends.. I kinda lost track of him. But why in the world of fuck would you slap a mediocre Ashley Wood cover on a Kazuo Umezu book? IDW, you’re out.

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